Ludo Hosts 10-Course Meal for Potential Traitors

Traitor's Table

Photo courtesy of Jay Mata

Eighteen people converged at Ludo Board Game Cafe in Quezon City on the 9th of February, 2015, to try to betray each other in the name of play and food. With all the hype the Valentine’s week was bringing, Ludo decided to ditch the sweety-sweety social event and go with something more… interesting.

Enter the Traitor’s Table. At P800, guests get to enjoy a 10-course meal. But here’s the catch: food at one end of the long table is exquisite, and slowly gets not-so-desirable towards the other end. Guests get seated at random, initially. Then, before each course, dinner partners decide if they want to cooperate or betray each other by putting down a white tile or a black tile. The tiles are hidden, then revealed simultaneously. If the partners both decide to cooperate, both move up two seats towards the good food. If both end up betraying each other, they move two seats down towards the bad food. But if one betrays the other, and the other cooperates, the traitor moves up four seats towards the good food, and the cooperator moves four seats towards the bad food.

Traitor's Table

Photo courtesy of Jay Mata

And so eighteen arrived, and the night was chaos. Pure bliss. Food ranged from scallops with parmesan sauce, rib-eye steak, and salmon crustini, to canned sardines, pancit canton, and adobong mani. Oh, and with puto and Jollibee spaghetti thrown somewhere in the middle. There was chatting, there was laughter, and there were shouts of “We don’t want your food, we want justice!” And of course, there were betrayals. There were promises of cooperation that ended up in betrayals. And all for the sake of buko pandan or some other delectable delight.

“The idea didn’t originate from us,” says Jay Mata of Ludo. “It’s actually a dinner game event that is getting buzz in London called Betrayer’s Banquet. We heard such good things from friends there that we wanted to import the concept.”

The Traitor’s Table and its London counterpart use¬†a concept in game theory¬†called the Prisoner’s Dilemma, where, in the academic illustration, two prisoners’ decision to cooperate or betray each other will determine the length of their jail sentences.

For anyone who thinks a normal dinner party is just too mundane, Ludo is also offering the Traitor’s Table as a party package. You can check out their Facebook Page here.